Your Feedback

During the months of September and October 2017, the City of Coral Gables invited the community to provide feedback on the proposed bikeway options for the Gables Greenways. Over the course of this public outreach effort:

  • Social media posts reached more than 20,000 people, generating over 1,000 likes and comments.
  • There were over 1,200 unique visitors to the Gables Greenways website.
  • Mailers were sent to more than XX households along the Greenways.
  • Flyers were handed to more than XX businesses along the Greenways.
  • Articles were included in The Miami Herald, Coral Gables E-News, Commissioner Mena's Newsletter, Commissioner Lago's Newsletter, Bike Walk Coral Gables' Newsletter, The Underline's Newsletter, the Miami-Dade County Transportation Planning Organization's Newsletter, and The Miami Bike Scene.
  • Over 150 people visited the Gables Greenways table at the Giralda Plaza Grand Opening Celebration.
  • Over 60 people attended the October 18 Open House at the Coral Gables Library.
  • Over 40 people attended the September 28 Open House at the Coral Gables Museum.
  • More than 50 people filled out the online survey at the Gables Greenways website.
  • Over 50 people heard about the Gables Greenways at one of the monthly Gables Bike Tours.

Participants were asked which type of bikeway they would primarily like to see the City use for both residential streets and downtown streets. The responses are included below:

Residential Streets

Example: Riviera Drive

Responses-1.png

Downtown Streets

Example: Salzedo Street

Responses-2.png

Additional feedback provided for each type of bikeway is included below:

Conventional Bike Lanes on Residential Streets

The top reasons for supporting this type of bikeway included:

  • Not approaching the project as a one size fits all solution, but being flexible depending on the particular section of roadway.
  • Being better than nothing, and encouraging people to bike.
  • Requiring only minimal road widening.
  • Potentially being less expensive to build and maintain.
  • Potentially creating less opposition.

The top concerns raised included:

  • Not being safe enough for children to ride.
  • Not being comfortable enough to encourage more people to bike.
  • Not doing enough to separate bikes and cars.

The top suggestions provided included:

  • Making the bike lanes a different color.
  • Adding more trees and landscaping.
  • Making the bike lanes as wide as possible.
  • Enforcing speed limits and vehicles blocking the bike lanes.
  • Keeping up with regular maintenance.
  • Adding a rumble strip and/or reflectors.
  • Having clear signage.
  • Narrowing the vehicular travel lanes.
  • Having well marked crosswalks for bikes and pedestrians.
  • Creating a targeted educational campaign.
  • Having clear and visible markings.
  • Making sure the bike lanes have smooth pavement.
  • Having dedicated traffic lights for bikes.
  • Adding traffic calming features.

Buffered Bike Lanes on Residential Streets

The top reasons for supporting this type of bikeway included:

  • Allowing faster cyclists to pass slower bike riders.
  • Providing separation from cars.
  • Requiring less maintenance than separated bike lanes.
  • Providing more room for bicyclists to maneuver.
  • Giving bicyclists more visual prominence than separated bike lanes or shared-use paths.
  • Potentially being less expensive than separated bike lanes.
  • Potentially being safer.

The top concerns raised included:

  • Being ugly.
  • Road widening potentially encouraging cars to drive faster.
  • Road widening potentially having a negative impact on home values.

The top suggestions provided included:

  • Adding rumble strips and/or reflectors.
  • Making the bike lanes a different color.
  • Adding more trees and landscaping.
  • Adding a physical barrier, like a curb or concrete planters to the buffer.
  • Having dedicated traffic lights for bikes.
  • Adding no parking signs.
  • Making the buffer wider.
  • Having clear and visible markings.
  • Having clear signage.
  • Adding traffic calming features.
  • Making sure the bike lanes have smooth pavement.
  • Keeping up with regular maintenance.
  • Increasing enforcement.
  • Designing the buffer stripes to be artful.
  • Adding a separate “walking” lane.
  • Pairing with a Shared-Use Path.

Buffered Bike Lanes

Separated Bike Lanes on Residential Streets

The top reasons for supporting this type of bikeway included:

  • Potentially being safer.
  • Being more comfortable.
  • Being more family friendly.
  • Being beautiful.
  • Adding landscaping.
  • Being more convenient than a shared-use path.
  • Encouraging more people to bike.
  • Being more visible to drivers than a shared-use path.

The top concerns raised included:

  • Looking like a sidewalk and thus encouraging conflicts with pedestrians.
  • Making it more difficult to pass slower riders and maneuver around obstacles.

The top suggestions provided included:

  • Adding more landscaping to the buffer.

  • Making the bike lanes as wide as possible.

  • Adding physical barriers such as a curb to the buffer.

  • Planting more trees.

  • Keeping the bike lanes clear of debris.

  • Having clear and visible crossings at intersections.

  • Adding sidewalks where they are missing.

  • Making the bike lane pavement smooth and even with the road.

  • Lowering and enforcing speed limits.

  • Adding lighting along the bike lanes.

  • Planting native vegetation.

  • Adding traffic calming.

  • Having clear signage.

  • Reducing ugly signage.

  • Having dedicated traffic lights for bikes.

  • Narrowing the travel lanes.

  • Stabilizing the soil in the buffer to prevent ruts.

  • Painting the bike lane a different color.

  • Adding rumble strips.

Shared-Use Paths on Residential Streets

The top reasons for supporting this type of bikeway included:

  • Potentially being safer.

  • Requiring less disruptive construction.

  • Being family friendly.

  • Being a benefit to pedestrians and joggers, not just bicyclists.

  • Maintaining the residential character.

The top concerns raised included:

  • Potentially being more dangerous.

  • Creating conflicts between bikes and pedestrians.

  • Making it less convenient for bikes.

  • Making it more difficult to maneuver around obstacles.

  • Not being a type of facility that road cyclists will use.

  • Creating potential conflicts with motorists backing out of driveways.

The top suggestions provided included:

  • Making the paths as wide as possible.

  • Having clear signage and markings.

  • Giving clear priority to the path at intersections.

  • Adding landscaping along the paths.

  • Planting more trees.

  • Adding lighting along the paths.

  • Creating raised crossings at intersections.

  • Enforcing no parking on paths.

  • Maintaining smooth and even pavement on the paths.

  • Maintaining paths clear of debris.

  • Making the path visible at driveways and intersections.

  • Making the paths a different color.

  • Pairing with buffered bike lanes.

Shared-Use Path


Conventional Bike Lanes on Downtown Streets

The top reasons for supporting this type of bikeway included:

  • Allowing faster cyclists to pass slower riders by moving into the adjacent travel lane.
  • Making bicyclists more visible to drivers.

The top concerns raised included:

  • Not being safe.
  • Doors opening into the bike lanes.
  • Not being a comfortable place to ride.

The top suggestions provided included:

  • Having clear and effective signage and markings.
  • Making the bike lanes a different color.
  • Lowering the speed limit and enforcing it.
  • Planting shade trees.
  • Making the bike lanes wide enough.
  • Keeping the bike lanes clear of debris.
  • Running an anti-dooring educational campaign.
  • Adding rumble strips.

Separated Bike Lanes on Downtown Streets

The top reasons for supporting this type of bikeway included:

  • Being safer.
  • Being more predictable and easier to navigate than a two-way cycle track.
  • Providing separation from traffic.

The top concerns raised included:

  • The potential loss of on-street parking.

The top suggestions provided included:

  • Providing separate traffic lights for bicyclists.
  • Adding left turn provisions for bicycles.
  • Moving planters to make sure bicyclists are visible at intersections.
  • Adding shade trees.
  • Adding roundabouts at key intersections.

Separated Cycle Tracks on Downtown Streets

The top reasons for supporting this type of bikeway included:

  • Providing more separation from traffic.
  • Being safer.
  • Providing enough room to plant trees along both sides of the street.
  • Being family-friendly.
  • Giving more room for bikes to maneuver.

The top concerns raised included:

  • Intersections being more dangerous due to the bi-directional nature of the cycle track.
  • Making transitions to the bi-directional lane more complicated for bicyclists.

The top suggestions provided included:

  • Having more landscaping in the buffer.
  • Planting shade trees as shown in the long term image.
  • Having clear and effective signage and markings.
  • Providing separate traffic lights for bicyclists.
  • Making the cycle track a different color.
  • Enforcing traffic laws to prevent parking on the cycle track.
  • Adding pedestrian scale lighting.
  • Making the cycle track as wide as possible.
  • Making sure the pavement is smooth and even.
  • Adding bike boxes at key intersections.
  • Maintaining the cycle track clear of debris.
  • Burying the power lines.